Just One More Time

Not that the phenomenon is unique, but in Minnesota you can bet that you have been fully assimilated into the culture when you participate in the “Minnesota Goodbye,”a highly ritualized, almost liturgical set of behaviors. The Minnesota Goodbye is a cultural artifact with its probable roots deeply held in the Germanic, Scandinavian, Southeast Asian and sub-Saharan African populations, not to mention the Irish and the English, that so richly spice our little corner of these United States. Combine cultural roots with a weather pattern that does not encourage going outside for at least six months of the calendar year, and you can probably begin to understand how the Minnesota Goodbye became the well-developed ritual that it is, and why it has taken on an almost religious function in our social practice here on the frozen tundra.

The Minnesota Goodbye occurs when visitors indicate they are ready to go. The host carefully walks them to the door where host and guests stand and chat as if the evening is young and they have not been together for the past three or four hours. Often, the most important exchange of information at a social occasion takes place during the Minnesota Goodbye, for it is in this space where host and guest are assured of one on one time together. Frequently punctuated by the phrase, “let me say just one more thing and then we will call it a night,” the Minnesota Goodbye has been known to last for upwards and beyond an hour in length and for those who are not accustomed to its rituals, it can seem almost irritating in the breadth of its timing and depth of its sharing. Those of us who are not native to Minnesota find ourselves asking why we did not engage in such conversation during the evening’s socializing, or at least why we held such an important discussion until we were at the door. When I first came to Minnesota, I found myself asking such questions (not to my guests of course) of myself and my wife. But eventually as we shed our otherworldliness and cloaked ourselves in the cultural mores of Minnesotans, we became accustomed to the rituals associated with leaving, and now participating in the Minnesota Goodbye seems so normal that to not participate in its rituals would leave us feeling empty, as if our visits were superficial. And we have come to appreciate the Minnesota Goodbye for its utility in ensuring that what must be communicated between good friends is actually shared, that what should be said does not remain unspoken, that a silent chasm between good friends cannot exist. The Minnesota Goodbye is an assurance that just one more thing cannot be left out of the evening’s visit or the joy that comes with friendship’s deep communication.

Medical practice can be very much like the Minnesota Goodbye.

No doctor wishes to leave any stone unturned in the treatment of her patients. Good doctors especially want to make sure that they have considered all relevant variables and possibilities as they construct a recommendation for appropriate treatment. It is the medical version of the Minnesota Goodbye so that just one more thing is often the rule and not the exception. Just one more thing has tremendous ramifications for patients. In the moment of medical crisis it can offer reassurance that all possibilities will be considered. Conversely, in the moment of deep peace, just one more thing can create disruption where it may not be necessary.

I know this firsthand.

My treatment up to this point is framed by the need for managing the ever increasing demands of my symptoms, even as they become more and more difficult to manage. For example, in July, I began to experience difficulties in swallowing. With the help of my neurologist, I worked through the pros and cons of having a feeding tube placed, in case swallowing became so difficult that I would not be able to eat. At that time, I decided that the risks associated with the operation – sedation, being in a hospital, possible side effects of a surgical procedure no matter how simple a surgeon felt it to be – far outweighed the possible good of the feeding tube, and thus I determined that the placement of a feeding tube was not an appropriate treatment for me at the time.

A number of my friends and doctors, extremely well-meaning in their probity, have asked me the question, “Why did you not place a feeding tube early on in your progression?” It is a good question and probably more indicative of what we have learned about ALS in the four years since my diagnosis than on any strong personal feelings about feeding tubes. When I was diagnosed, the focus question was on whether to place a feeding tube or not. Now, many neurologists who treat ALS are more focused on the question of whether one would like to keep their nutrition up for as long as possible, citing the fact that weight loss is highly correlated with lack of survival. Upon receiving an affirmative answer to the question of nutrition, only then do they introduce the question of the feeding tube. It isn’t so much that we didn’t know the importance of nutrition, but the fact is that four years ago, the medical approach focused more on the question of a feeding tube almost as if it was separate from the question of nutrition. Since I had experienced no difficulty swallowing, even up through January of this year, I did not wish to submit to one more procedure that would require care and attention by another person when it seemed that it was unnecessary. Hence, up until July when I was able to swallow without any concern, the placement seemed superfluous, and after July when I was able to analyze the inherent risks, my decision remained firm.

I have likened ALS to a train on the tracks, seemingly in slow motion, unable to veer left or right, coming straight at me as I am stalled in this body and am unable to leave the rails.I am highly aware that with ALS, the final cause of death will probably be a combination of lack of nutrition due to eating difficulties and the buildup of carbon dioxide due to breathing difficulties, more likely the effects of the latter. At this point in time when I need to see my respiratory therapist once a month to bump up the BiPAP’s airflow and exhalation, when I need to see my hospice nurse once a week just to bump up my symptom management, when the conversations that Ev and I have are liberally salted with discussion of just how we desire the end to go, I am at peace with the life I have been given, accepting of the death with which I am gifted, and grateful for every day that I still awaken. It is a good space for a person to spend their final months. And I think that my physicians, my healers, my beloved doctors and nurses and therapists are okay with me being in this privileged space.

And in this carefully constructed space, where we are at peace, just one more thing knocked on our door and turned our world upside down just one more time.

The best doctors leave no stone unturned. A dear friend of mine, a neurologist and expert, suggested I look at an alternative way to place a feeding tube. The logic was impeccable. Why should you have to spend so much energy and time on eating when the quality of your meal time could be focused on taste while nutrition could be taken through a feeding tube? And I had to admit that such a possibility actually sounded pretty good. We discussed a procedure that could be done with me awake and on BiPAP during the entire time. Yes, it would mean I would have to give up my Do Not Resuscitate and Do Not Intubate orders, for what surgeon would want to operate under such circumstances, but the idea of spending less physical time and especially less psychological time on eating was appealing. And, as I played out the possibilities with my family, I thoughts that I could see them lighting up with hope that such a procedure might result in longer survival, a better quality of life. But as I considered the downside to the operation, I had to be honest that with the intubation might come the need to utilize invasive ventilation, something that early on I decided I did not want to consider for my treatment. So, another way to look at this would be higher quality of life versus dying during the operation or a day or two after due to other complications.

I know that these decisions are extremely personal, and that what seems to fit the type of life that I wish to lead could be totally inappropriate for another facing the exact same decisions. I only share this to illustrate how easy just one more thing can suddenly raise itself into your world, your consciousness, your deep analysis and consideration. And that is exactly what happened. The relative peace and calm that we had worked so hard to establish was suddenly disrupted, turned on its ear. and everything that I had imagined as to what constituted a good death was thrown up into the air as I considered the procedure.

Here is the point. Whether you think such disruptions are for the better or worse, the fact is that even when you believe everything is worked out, it is not. And the process of my working through the feeding tube decision required consultation with two different neurologists, two different nurses, a trusted friend at the ALS Association, both of my sons and my beloved wife, and finally our hospice providers. And even though I perceived a hopeful outcome, the 10 days spent in attempting to make a well considered decision also raised feelings of disruption, resentment, irrational hope, and even despair for my family and friends, for me especially, as all of us considered the ramifications of the decision that had presented itself like a Minnesota Goodbye careening out of control.

And what finally led me to decide not to do the procedure? Two different pieces of information surfaced from my two dear neurologists – one was that even if the procedure worked it would not in most probability, lengthen my life; two was that this particular type of feeding tube was susceptible to needing replacement more often than I would probably find acceptable. But the piece of information that really cinched the decision was this: I would have to go off hospice. As I considered the ramifications, I realized how dependent we had become on our hospice care providers for the stability of schedule and environment that they gave us. We had established meaningful routines again, we knew who to call and for what, and we really liked the people with whom we were working as they seemed to understand our goals for peace and dignity and joy in the end. And in the end, it was the possibility of losing the human qualities that hospice had brought to this complicated process of dying, that led us to utterly and completely reject both the hopeful possibilities and the frightening counter indications of placing a feeding tube.

Please understand that there is no blame or bad feeling here. I just think it is highly illustrative of how easy the turn of one more stone can shift the foundation of the carefully constructed life. When you are dying, that careful construction is remarkably helpful. And while it is always good to consider the treatment possibilities that do exist, it is just as important to consider how such treatments can disrupt and affect quality of life. Consider how so many of my brothers and sisters in ALS reach beyond their own capacity for something, anything that might offer them a little more life. This extremely human desire makes all of us susceptible to the seduction that comes with the medical version of just one more thing. Who can blame us? So many are young with so much possibility ahead, cruelly robbed by ALS, so that the idea of just one more thing is very seductive. But if you stop and think about it, this susceptibility is more a statement of the value we place on the unknown future, than the gratitude we feel for a past well lived. I know people in their eighties who are having difficulty negotiating their impending deaths. Just one more thing appeals highly two and a irrational future when you cannot find peace with the inevitable present.

Yet, as right and good as I feel with the decisions I have made, with the space I am given as I wend my way toward death, I can still feel the pull of the Minnesota Goodbye. To remain in this peaceful, beautiful space, requires a concentrated effort, a projection of gratitude and acceptance, and the conscious receipt of a peace that passes all understanding. I have come to the point where just one more thing is fine for executing the ritual of the Minnesota Goodbye, but for realizing a life well lived,  just one more thing interrupts the stream of conscious love I am becoming, as I tumble into the river where all life finally ends and continues to its source.

And if I change my mind, I’ll make sure I tell you as we walk toward the door and bid each other adieu.

Advertisements

Just Delivery

If you are paying attention, recall that I have written of how ALS circles around, how just when a suitable strategy for dealing with the current reality emerges, how just when the day to day living becomes something routine enough to handle, how just when comfort in the new normal is almost old normal; one more piece falls away, and the circle morphs into spirals down and down. I have written of circles delivered in packages sparkling with new knowledge or laden heavy with despair, packages complete, with no room for negotiation, no space for discussion, no rejection, no acceptance. I have written about how circling back is not for the faint of heart, for even today, five days after the event, with visits and dinners with dear friends and time with family in between, with the opportunity to physically process and psychically work through the latest loss, I am still amazed at how insidious my dis ease teacher can be.

It was the smallest of things.

I just finished a phone conversation with the editor for the MDA ALS newsletter. She had suggested that an occasional sampling of this blog might be good for persons and caregivers in the ALS arena. You may or may not realize this, but I am sensitive to anything that might be perceived as me speaking for more than me. It is not my intent for this blog to represent anyone’s experience but my own, for that is the only experience for which I can claim any deep knowledge. So I was concerned that in sampling the blog, I might be seen as overstepping the boundaries that I have set for myself. Such boundaries weigh heavily, and I take them very seriously. I am also very aware that for a number of people who read this blog, these descriptions of my experiences are close enough to their own experiences that voice is given where voice might have been silent. In the end, I agreed to the sampling due to her understanding and sensitivity to my concerns. It was a nice conversation.

And then…

My phone is on a piece of Velcro that sits on the right arm of my power wheel chair. It is not the most ideal placement for a phone. Sometimes when it rings, I have great difficulty getting my arm twisted around to slide the unlocking mechanism and answer it. Other times my arm is resting over the phone so that it is totally inaccessible. Usually I try to hold the phone so that I can point the microphone toward my face, as I lack the arm strength to actually bring the phone up to my ear. All of this is to say that were you in the field of risk management, you probably would have easily predicted some minor disaster with the way that I do the phone. Five days ago, I was just weak enough after the aforementioned telephone conversation, that as I tried to place the phone back in its right arm position, it flew over the side of the chair. In my effort to keep it from falling to the floor, my right arm became wedged behind the chair’s arm.

And there I sat.

This has happened to me before, so I didn’t panic. Instead, I tried all manner of ways to get my arm back on the chair. I tried turning my upper body, grabbing the leg guides with my left hand and pulling myself forward, flipping my right arm out and forward, even quasi-fishing my hand up with the seatbelt in order to get it back on the arm of the chair. After about 10 minutes, I realized that I was actually in real trouble. My arm position meant that I could not change the position of my body, which was leaned in just the right way as to constrict my breathing, and with it being my right arm, I could not reach the controls for the chair. I could feel my hand and forearm swelling with the gravitational pooling of fluids so that my fingers would not bend, and awareness slowly bloomed into the full consciousness that I was caught, trapped, unable to breathe deeply, unable to move, unable to perform the simplest of acts.

I watched the time tick forward, one minute, five minutes, one hour. Every once in a while I thought I heard someone walking in our building, and at that point I would yell as loudly as I could, “Help, help, help, help!” I soon realized that this yelling was pointless. It was just tiring me out, and making it more difficult to yell when the time might be right.

So I waited.

An hour and one half after my arm’s tumble, I heard the UPS truck pull up, I heard the rolling door clatter open, I heard the deliveryman come into the building, and I held my breath. Would he bring the package up to our condo? Would he ring the bell and dash off as he often does? Would he come to my floor, to my side of the building? I knew that I couldn’t allow him to get away. I started yelling, and when the doorbell rang, I redoubled my efforts, yelling at the top of my voice, “Help me, help me, please open the door and help me!” And this very kind man came rushing in, “I’m here, I’m here. Tell me what to do.”

I’m sure he was puzzled that all I needed was my arm lifted back onto the chair. I’m sure it seemed like such a tiny thing to him. I’m sure he had no realization of the relief that he offered, breathing and mobility and comfort. But he did it, and I spent the rest of the day seeking some equilibrium. My hand was quite swollen and did not want to operate the wheelchair controls. My body overheated with the exertion of trying to free myself, yet once I was free, sweat evaporated into shivering, teeth rattling, frozen to the core coldness. And when Ev came home, I was so relieved to see her that I burst into tears.

Welcome to the new normal.

Today, I know that our plan, our strategy to try to get me through to the summer at the level of care I currently receive, is not going to work. I am just too helpless, and I hate it. From now on, I need to make sure that somebody is around, at least checking in, just in case. In essence I have turned a corner into a new level of ALS. It seems like just yesterday I had chosen to begin walking with a cane. It seems like just yesterday that I gave up driving. It seems like just yesterday that I accepted that I needed homecare assistance. And today, I have to accept that the assistance that I need is far more significant than the assistance that I want.

I have no words of wisdom or philosophy, no frameworks from which I can turn these cold truths, no spaces of healing or warmth or acceptance from which I can approach this new reality. It will come, at some point it will have to come. But today, I am just shaken up by how easy, how fragile, how fleeting this gift of living is.

And that is quite a package to have delivered.

The Bargain

It has been almost 6 months since I received my diagnosis of ALS, and what a ride that has been. After the initial smackdown of the diagnosis, the ups and downs of medical flurry, and settling in to a dis ease routine, this last 6 months has been quite an experience. One of the most interesting developments for me is what I have come to call the hope bargain. It is the kind of thing that everyone does, but I have to admit that my version is just a little embarrassing. Part über-reality, part fantastic dream, the hope bargain for me is a strange hybrid experience. This past three weeks, as I have reengaged with the medical world–Mayo at the beginning of the month, and this week with the research clinic in the Twin Cities–the hope bargain is front and center for my consciousness.

Everyone has their little hope bargains. In my old normal, I’d hope for a green light and bargain that I’d never be in the intersection when it turned red again (a pretty hopeless Minnesotan thing to say by the way). I’d note that my bike needed work, hoping I could put it off one more ride by bargaining—“Please just let me get this ride done and then I’ll fix it.” I’ll bet you have hope bargains in your own lives—everything from how to lower your cholesterol, to hoping that the extra 15 minutes of cooking didn’t ruin the meal. I think it is human, and it raises questions about why we think it does any good and with whom do we think we are bargaining anyway. For the most part, it has always struck me as a pretty harmless, maybe even healthy thing to do. It is kind of like the Jeff Goldblum line from The Big Chill, “Don’t knock rationalization. Where would we be without it?” I’ve just assumed that hope bargains were an everyday part of the human experience.

Now for me, the hope bargain has changed a bit. With all the effort I make to live in the moment, to accept the things I cannot change, to be as I am to be, with all that work, I have an intense hope bargain going on. Based in a past life that reminds me of its power every single day, and looking forward to a future that I cannot help but want, it is the hope that somehow, some way, this dis ease thing can be slowed or stopped. I hope, I bargain, and it goes something like this.

“I can handle this if it’s just taking my legs. Please, I’ll put up with anything if it is only my legs.” It’s a quasi-whiny version of Cat Stevens old song, “Moon Shadow”—“and if I ever lose my legs, I won’t moan and I won’t beg.” Well, I’m moanin’ and beggin, at least in this little prayer. Or maybe it is something like, “I promise to laugh more and cry less, if only I don’t have to do a vent in this progression.” You get the picture. It is perseverance on a theme of Kübler-Ross, only without the denial or the acceptance. While it is a little embarrassing to admit I do this, I know that these hope bargains have been more than helpful to me. They have helped me to get my head around a precious past and a scary future without needing to be overwhelmed by either. Believe it or not, they have helped me center myself and to feel the spiritual strength I need to face the issue of the day, whether it be dis ease’s relationship with work, home, or something else. In some ways, the very act of the hope bargain is the greatest hope and biggest bargain of them all.

I have two things I want to share that have really brought the hope bargain home to me in the past three weeks. First, it is the wisdom of the Mayo folks and how they worked on me to accept riding a scooter. Second, it is the fact that I reconnected with the great research clinic folks in the Twin Cities, and I am poised to start a drug trial. I’ll start with Mayo wisdom.

My last visit to Mayo left me energized. I’ve complained in the past about feeling like I was a collection of symptoms when I go to clinic, and there was some of that in this visit. But I had decided to get through that part, and I am glad I did. The clinic staff clearly had an agenda: “OK, so ALS isn’t your first choice, but given that you have it, what do you want to be able to do?” What a hopeful question–my answer, “I want to work. I love my job. As long as my colleagues feel I am advancing the cause, I want to be there.” They noted that I talked consistently about conserving energy in an environment that needs energy projected. “How might you project energy?” they asked. “I need to get out more,” I answered. “Would you consider a scooter?” My reply, “I don’t want a scooter.” With humor, gentility, a little tough-love and perseverance, they wore down my stubborn hopelessness, installed a little hope and got me to accept a bargain–if I want to work writ large, I have to be more mobile. “We can arrange for a scooter for you through the ALS Association.” As difficult as it is for me to accept the diminution that a scooter brings, I have to say that it is a great way to conserve and project energy. It is a bargain that presents hope for work. Suffice it to say, that I am learning to do Management/Leadership By Scooting Around. It is a sea change that saves energy, and has freed my sense of place.

My second hope bargain is bigger than a scooter, for this week, I enter the international drug trial for dexpramipexole through the Berman Center. I cannot tell you how hopeful I am about this. First, it is finally an opportunity to DO something, to say directly to my ALS, “you might not get everything your way after all.” The Phase II trials have been very encouraging, and even though, as the Mayo’s very wise and kind Dr. Jones reminded me, there is a long history of hopeful Phase II’s that ALS has crushed in Phase III, somehow this one seems different to me. Yes the trial is double-blind. Yes it is placebo controlled. But I’m in, and even if I get the placebo, I’ve decided to hope in the placebo effect. The bright and caring Dr. Tiryaki took me through a lot of the research numbers yesterday, and I think that even she, with her very realistic look on ALS, is hoping that this time in spite of everything, we might double the number of drugs available to slow down or manage this dis ease. I think we are all in a bit of a hope bargain on this one.

So I want you to know, that I have this hope bargain. I’m not dead yet—far from it. I have hopes. I bargain those hopes, sometimes meaningfully and sometimes not so much. Through the luck of geography that allows me to access the medical expertise of an entire state, and the discipline of naming the bargains and keeping alive the hopes, I see a path, probably with wheels, that is keeping me keeping on.

In the words of Pete Townsend, “I call that a bargain, the best I ever had.”